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Coming soon is the 3rd annual World Shorebirds Day on 6 September 2016! Will you be among the hundreds of shorebird enthusiasts, scientists, conservationists, and educators around the world celebrating it? For György Szimuly, U.K.-based shorebird advocate and photographer who created World Shorebirds Day (WSD), “This day was inspired by the ongoing conservation issues that shorebirds are facing around the world.” Most of the world’s shorebird species are experiencing significant population declines—some since the 1970s, others more recently. Habitat loss and human disturbance, among other threats, continue to take a particular toll on these birds globally. World Shorebirds Day reminds us that every sector of society can play a role in helping these species to recover and thrive long term. Global Shorebird Counting is the central theme of WSD. You are encouraged to not only go out and observe shorebirds where you live, but also record how many of each species you see. Consistent monitoring is a core tool in conserving shorebird species and habitats, and WSD is a great opportunity for people of all skill levels to contribute towards the very real need for shorebird population data worldwide. The window for counting is 2–6 September 2016. Learn more about registering your local site and submitting data.
All 96 WHSRN Sites and, more directly, the hundreds of people committed to their good stewardship, comprise the most successful network for shorebird conservation in the Western Hemisphere. As such, we have the potential to contribute the greatest amount of count data to this global effort from “our” hemisphere. It is inspiring that many WHSRN sites have already put themselves on the WSD site map – but there are MANY more to go! It’s easy to register your WHSRN site and, later, enter your counts in the eBird database. Your WHSRN Executive Office staff will be participating in educational field trips, shorebird counts, and/or local community celebrations at various places throughout the Americas: Asunción Bay WHSRN Site in Paraguay; Santiago, Chile; and at wetlands in coastal Maine and Massachusetts (USA). Our Director Rob Clay will be in Barbados at the landmark Woodbourne Shorebird Refuge—a former shorebird “shooting swamp” turned sanctuary. Read more about this refuge and past WSD observance in WHSRNews: November 2009; September 2014.
Courtesy of Centro Bahía Lomas, Chile.
WHSRN Site partners, if you haven’t already done so, please register your WHSRN site today! Connect with others in the Network by sharing your plans and photos via the WHSRN Facebook page and WSD Facebook page, using #worldshorebirdsday. Friends and neighbors of WHSRN sites, check our list or Google Map of sites to find a WHSRN site near you. Click on the name or placemarker for a link to its Site Profile, which has local contact information and websites. This is also available via our downloadable, interactive, Google Earth WHSRN map. Happy World Shorebirds Day everyone!   source: www.whsrn.org
3rd annual World Shorebirds Day on 6 September 2016

Coming soon is the 3rd annual World Shorebirds Day on 6 September 2016! Will you be among the hundreds of shorebird enthusiasts, scientists, conservationists, and educators around the world celebrating it?

Starting this year, the International Wader Study Group will be awarding small projects with small grants (IWSG Small Projects Grants). Read more here.  
IWSG Small Projects Grants

Starting this year, the International Wader Study Group will be awarding small projects with small grants (IWSG Small Projects Grants). Read more here.  

From elation to devastation. Over the last few days, the two viable eggs at Slimbridge successfully hatched producing two perfect looking Spoon-billed Sandpiper chicks. The chicks seemed to do well initially but their health deteriorated and within 60 hours of hatching both chicks died.   Read the full story and other spoonbill news here.  
Death of the first two captive-bred spoonbill chicks at Slimbridge

From elation to devastation. Over the last few days, the two viable eggs at Slimbridge successfully hatched producing two perfect looking Spoon-billed Sandpiper chicks. The chicks seemed to do well initially but their health deteriorated and within 60 hours of hatching both chicks died.   Read the full story and other spoonbill news here.  

Brett Sandercock and Susan Skagen have been made honorary members of the Cooper Ornithological Society!
Congratulations Brett Sandercock and Susan Skagen!

Brett Sandercock and Susan Skagen have been made honorary members of the Cooper Ornithological Society!

Guy Morrison has been honoured by being made a Member of the Order of Canada!
Congratulations Guy Morrison!

Guy Morrison has been honoured by being made a Member of the Order of Canada!

Three black-bellied plovers have been tracked from their wintering grounds back to their breeding grounds, completing the annual cycle of this species.  These birds were originally tagged on Bathurst Island during the breeding season of 2015 by The Center for Conservation Biology and Canadian Wildlife Service staff.  These birds were tracked to a broad range of wintering locations, and recently migrated back to their breeding grounds.  This annual migration cycle of black-bellies was previously unknown and the study has begun to shed light on the behaviors and habitats of the plovers.   To read the full story by Fletcher Smith, go to the Center for Conservation Biology Website.
Black-bellied plovers complete annual cycle

Three black-bellied plovers have been tracked from their wintering grounds back to their breeding grounds, completing the annual cycle of this species.  These birds were originally tagged on Bathurst Island during the breeding season of 2015 by The Center for Conservation Biology and Canadian Wildlife Service staff.  These birds were tracked to a broad range of wintering locations, and recently migrated back to their breeding grounds.  This annual migration cycle of black-bellies was

One of the greatest challenges in managing migratory birds is that they exist within a legal quandary. As a recognized principle of international law, states have sovereign rights over all wild animals that fall within their jurisdictional boundaries but no jurisdiction over animals outside of these boundaries. The practical result of this principle is that animals that migrate from one jurisdiction to another are subject, in succession, to the sovereign rights and policies of all states along their migration route. According to conventional international law, there is nothing to prevent a jurisdiction from overexploiting a migratory species to the point of extinction while other jurisdictions expend considerable resources to protect it. Because a migratory population represents a single biological unit, cooperation among range states is critical to successful management. To read the full story by Bryan Watts, go to the Center for Conservation Biology Website.
Assessment of shorebird hunting policies published

One of the greatest challenges in managing migratory birds is that they exist within a legal quandary. As a recognized principle of international law, states have sovereign rights over all wild animals that fall within their jurisdictional boundaries but no jurisdiction over animals outside of these boundaries. The practical result of this principle is that animals that migrate from one jurisdiction to another are subject, in succession, to the sovereign rights and policies of all states along

The outer coast of the mid-Atlantic region has become an important site for the conservation of both breeding peregrine falcons and migratory shorebirds. The region is a terminal, spring staging area where several shorebird species stop for an extended stay to build fat reserves for their final flight to arctic breeding grounds. The region has served this role for thousands of years and includes designated Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserves with both “hemispheric” and “international” status as well as many conservation lands dedicated to shorebird protection. The region is also the site where, during the 1970s, a decision was made to establish a breeding population of peregrine falcons to advance the cause of peregrine restoration in eastern North America. To read the full story by Bryan Watts, go to the Center for Conservation Biology Website.
Conservation in conflict: peregrines and shorebirds in the mid-Atlantic

The outer coast of the mid-Atlantic region has become an important site for the conservation of both breeding peregrine falcons and migratory shorebirds. The region is a terminal, spring staging area where several shorebird species stop for an extended stay to build fat reserves for their final flight to arctic breeding grounds. The region has served this role for thousands of years and includes designated Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserves with both “hemispheric” and “international”

On 25 August 2016 a symposium will be held in Wilhelmshaven, analysing the status of migratory birds on the East-Atlantic Flyway. Trends in migratory bird numbers are showing an alarming decline for many bird populations in the Wadden Sea. It is not clear whether the causes of the observed declines are to be found in the Wadden Sea, somewhere else along the East Atlantic Flyway, or both. Further information can be found on the webpage of the Common Wadden Sea Secretariat.
Symposium: The Wadden Sea – Still a reliable hub for migratory birds?

On 25 August 2016 a symposium will be held in Wilhelmshaven, analysing the status of migratory birds on the East-Atlantic Flyway. Trends in migratory bird numbers are showing an alarming decline for many bird populations in the Wadden Sea. It is not clear whether the causes of the observed declines are to be found in the Wadden Sea, somewhere else along the East Atlantic Flyway, or both. Further information can be found on the webpage of the Common Wadden Sea Secretariat.

A new ABC/BBC series explores in 4 parts the monumental journey millions of shorebirds make between their breeding grounds in arctic tundra and their wintering grounds in Australasia.   Episode I http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/offtrack/flying-for-your-life-1/7461802   Episode II http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/offtrack/flying-for-your-life-2/7479994
New ABC/BBC Migratory Shorebirds Series

A new ABC/BBC series explores in 4 parts the monumental journey millions of shorebirds make between their breeding grounds in arctic tundra and their wintering grounds in Australasia.   Episode I http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/offtrack/flying-for-your-life-1/7461802   Episode II http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/offtrack/flying-for-your-life-2/7479994